Tag: linkedin

Get more referrals with a preconfigured LinkedIn contacts search link

Instead of asking hiring managers, employees, and other candidates “Who do you know?”, wouldn’t it be great to say “Here is a list of people you know who meet my requirements, which are the best?”?  With this LinkedIn.com hack, you can send a link to a pre-configured search that will show relevant 1st degree connections of whoever clicks it.

For example, here is a list of your 1st degree connections who are recruiters in Seattle.

Watch the video below (which has over 4,300 views), or read a more detailed explanation on my post on LinkedIn titled “This LinkedIn Hack will blow your mind (and quadruple your referrals)“:

Increase Sourcing Productivity – My SourceCon Dallas Presentation

As a Talent Community Manager, I focus on candidate engagement via outbound marketing. I recently traveled to SourceCon Dallas to share tips on how I increase pipeline quantity without sacrificing quality or candidate experience.

This presentation is best viewed in presentation mode. Click the link below to download the PowerPoint file in presentation view:

Click here to download

Please contact me if you have any questions!

Reach passive talent through blog comments

With unemployment in the tech sector near zero, active candidates are hounded by dozens of recruiters as soon as their resume goes public.  While an active candidate sourcing strategy is imperative, passive candidate sourcing removes a lot of that recruiter competition, gives you more control over the process, and (some say) the talent is often better.

But how can we take sourcing beyond cold-calling and Google searches to beat our peers to the best passive candidates?  One simple method is to leave comments containing your jobs URL on blogs that are frequented by your target talent pool.

Here’s an example of how a simple blog comment can inject your jobs into the web browsing habits of passive candidates for free:

Continue reading »

LinkedIn, please add this

I cross post a lot of jobs to LinkedIn groups.  The only problem is, LinkedIn’s sharing tool posts my jobs to the general discussion section of each group.  Group admins and members don’t like this.  If LinkedIn will add the option to specify shared posts as job discussions, everybody wins.  More job sharing by recruiters, more content for LinkedIn, and better candidate experience for LinkedIn group members.

Sourcing Automation Tips

Here are some simple things I do to automate some of my sourcing program:

1) I create Google Alerts for RSS feeds of Google resume search results.  I get an update in Outlook whenever a new resume is spidered.

Continue reading »

Maximize your online recruiting spend

Every recruiter has one or more favorite job boards they use to post jobs and search resumes.  But job boards are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to developing a successful and holistic online recruiting campaign.

Continue reading »

Optimize Twitter and LinkedIn Profile Space

I do a lot of recruitment outreach via social media.  I have multiple Twitter accounts (@jubal_ince and @mscloudjobs), send about 100 LinkedIn InMails per day, and post heavily to LinkedIn groups, LinkedIn Answers, and I’m using Quora more and more.  This drives a lot of passive views of my social media profiles, so I make sure to optimize that space.

Continue reading »

LinkedIn Recruiter search by "fortune" size

One of the hard things about recruiting for a Fortune 100 company is that job titles don’t really translate.  If I conduct a search for a senior leadership role, like a Director or a VP, I’m going to get results containing mostly folks from small/medium businesses.   I’m sure these are talented folks, but I’m not going to engage a candidate for a Director role at huge global software company just because he/she is the VP of Marketing for Bob’s Soda Shack.

Continue reading »

Use LinkedIn Answers more effectively

Here’s a link to an article I recently contributed to Expert Bits (disclaimer, I launched Expert Bits and am the expert for the Internet Marketing channel).  This post focuses on the top 5 ways to use LinkedIn Answers, let me know what you think.

Forget the job search. Start a business today for $10.

For the first time in a long time, I’m considering working full-time for somebody else.  This is primarily due to the pending acquisition of my company’s largest profit center, but I also want to get off the farm and actually work with people for a few years.  Most people want to quit their office job and start their own business, while I (as usual) am moving in the opposite direction.  As I assume the role of job seeker, I thought I’d share some insight into just how easy it is to start an internet business.


I’ll go on record as saying internet businesses have the highest potential ROI of any business.  You hardly have to invest anything beside time, and you need very little else than a laptop and an internet connection.  Depending on what type of internet business you want to start, most of the components you need are freely available.  Here’s what I recommend:

1) Skip the hosting and web design.  Get a free blogger account and a $10 domain name.
Blogger blogs usually have a URL of something like myblogname.blogspot.com, but you can easily point any domain name at your blog, changing the URL to myblogname.com (or whatever).  Although this is technically blogging software, you can edit it so it looks like a “normal” website.  All of your content will already be optimized for search engines.  Get a domain name from GoDaddy for $10, then map your domain to Blogger.  Boom, no other payments for a year, until you have to renew your domain name.

2) Are you selling content or products?
Most websites are selling one of two things; content or products.  If you are selling content, you are most likely going to be blogging, generating traffic, and monetizing that traffic by selling advertisements on your website.  Use Blogger’s interface to plug in Google AdSense ads on your pages.  Use color combinations and positioning to make them non-intrusive yet still likely to be seen and clicked.  AdSense ads are usually pay-per-click, which means you earn revenue from Google for driving clicks to their ads.

If you’re going to be selling products, the approach is a bit different but can be done just as easily with the Blogger + custom domain approach.  Here’s a sample eCommerce T-shirt selling website I started as a demonstration.  This site acts as a search engine optimized store front for products I created with a free CafePress account.  Again, this is just a demonstration site, but if I were to drive users to it I would earn $5 for each T-shirt I sold, with no inventory to maintain.

Alternatively, you can use your new website to post information about products you actually possess, and use a free PayPal account to process orders.

3) None of this matters unless readers/customers can find your website. 
The best free (besides the time investment) methods of driving traffic is through search engines and social media.  You can read my blog or hundreds of others about how search engine optimization works, and once you master the basics you should be able to get some hits.  The other thing I recommend is blogging about your product/industry/knowledge (lucky your new website has a built in blog), then share links to your posts on social networks like facebook, twitter, and linkedin.  Those links will, I think, be spidered by search engines, and you’ll receive direct traffic from them as well.

Most people think you need thousands of dollars to start a business, but you don’t.  You just need a good idea and $10.